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Old 05-15-2016, 04:20 AM
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Laura Laura is offline
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Oh my Schumer: fully funding special ed services would save $ in the long run

SCHUMER REVEALS: FED DOLLARS THAT FUND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN WITH AUTISM & OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IS BEING
SHORTCHANGED BY TENS-OF-BILLIONS; SENATOR PUSHES TO PRESERVE & STRENGTHEN
CRITICAL SERVICES & PROGRAMS COUNTLESS KIDS DEPEND ON

SCHUMER REVEALS: FED DOLLARS THAT FUND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN WITH AUTISM & OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IS BEING
SHORTCHANGED BY TENS-OF-BILLIONS; SENATOR PUSHES TO PRESERVE & STRENGTHEN
CRITICAL SERVICES & PROGRAMS COUNTLESS KIDS DEPEND ON

With Millions Diagnosed As Having Autism Spectrum Disorder & Other
Developmental Disorders, Schumer Calls on Senate Appropriators to Fully
Fund ‘Individuals With Disabilities Education Act’ – IDEA Act; Act
Provides Funds to States for Special Educational Services to Children

In FY16, Funds for These Services Fell Short By Over $17 Billion; Funds
Help Ensure New York Special Education Students Have Access to High
Quality Services

Schumer: Shortchanging Kids With Disabilities Is Unfair & Costs More Down
The Road; Access to Quality Services Is An Investment

Today, U.S Senator Charles E. Schumer called for full funding of the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which helps provide
special education and related services to millions of children with autism
and other developmental disabilities across the country. Specifically,
this act provides funds to state and public agencies in order to address
all needs related to the country’s most vulnerable populations. Despite
the need for these funds, Schumer today explained that IDEA has never
received a full appropriation. In fact, in Fiscal Year 2016, federal
funding for IDEA Part B, which provides special educational services to
children, fell short by approximately $17.85 billion. Moreover, a report
recently issued by the Office of Autism Research Coordination and the
Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee suggested a lack of funding for
research related to autism-related services. As a result, Schumer is
urging the Senate Appropriations Committee to take action by providing
full funding for IDEA, and help make sure states, like New York, have the
federal funding they need to provide critical services to children with
developmental disabilities.

“There’s no better investment than one that provides children with access
to a quality education, but right now, millions of children living with
developmental disabilities are simply not getting the services they need
to succeed,” said Senator Schumer. “For far too long, federal funding for
special educational services has fallen short by tens of billions of
dollars. With millions of children living with autism and other
developmental disabilities, it’s time to provide full federal funding
towards the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which will help
our nation’s children thrive and help countless families breathe easy
knowing their kids have the services needed to succeed.”

Schumer said that millions of children across the country live with
developmental and other disabilities and rely on funding for special
education services to prepare them for a successful transition into
adulthood. According to the CDC, 1 in 68 children in the U.S. have been
identified with autism spectrum disorder. Additionally, 1 in 6 children
between the ages of 3 and17 years have one or more developmental
disabilities.

IDEA is comprised four sections: A, B, C and D; the majority of
educational services provided to children with disabilities fall under
IDEA Part B. Under Part B, individual states and local agencies are given
grants based on the state’s population of children between ages 3-21, and
the number of children within that age range living in poverty. The amount
of funding each state receives is determined by multiplying 40 percent of
the national average per pupil expenditure (APPE) by the number of
children with disabilities served. However, in Fiscal Year 2016, federal
funding for IDEA Part B only covered 16 percent of the APPE, meaning that
appropriations fell short of the full funding by approximately $17.85
billion dollars.

A recently published report issued by the Office of Autism Research
Coordination and the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee, determined
that a majority of autism funding —from both federal agencies and private
organizations— is used to conduct research on the biological risk factors
of autism rather than on services, such as early intervention and
integration services, that will help people living with autism live their
daily lives. The report found that in 2012, only about 7 percent of the
$332 million designated for autism research went to the development of
services and less than 1 percent of research funding went to issues that
follow people with autism throughout their lifetime. Of the remaining
funds, 30 percent of the funds went towards researching the biology of
autism and 17 percent went towards researching its risk factors.

Schumer acknowledges that learning more about the biology of autism is
extremely important to finding medical treatment, however, the federal
government must also prioritize funding for services that help children
with autism and other developmental disabilities live each day to their
fullest.

A copy of Schumer’s letter to the Senate Appropriations Committee is below:

Dear Chairman Blunt and Ranking Member Murray,

I write today on behalf of children with autism spectrum disorder and
other developmental disabilities to urge you to increase funding for Part
B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This program
serves one of our country’s most vulnerable populations, yet has never
received full funding. Children living with autism and other developmental
disabilities have the right to receive the high-quality, comprehensive
range of services provided by IDEA.

As you know, the majority of educational services provided to children
with developmental disabilities fall under IDEA Part B. This program
authorizes grants to states based on the state’s number of children
between ages 3-21 and the number of children within that age range living
in poverty. When passed into law, Congress authorized IDEA funding equal
to 40 percent of the national average per pupil expenditure (APPE)
multiplied by the number of children with disabilities served.
Unfortunately, IDEA has never received the full appropriation to help
ensure that children and families receiving services and supports thrive.

In Fiscal Year 2016, federal funding for IDEA Part B only covered 16
percent of APPE. This means that appropriations fell short of the full
funding by approximately $17.85 billion dollars. As the full funding
estimate continues to rise, it is critical that we work to close the gap
between this and the annual appropriation.

It is important that educational services and resources are available for
families and children with autism spectrum disorder and other
developmental disabilities. Unfortunately the ongoing lack of funding for
IDEA does not reflect the current need for services. A recent report
issued by the Office of Autism Research Coordination and the Interagency
Autism Coordination Committee found that only about seven percent of
funding for autism research went to the development of services and less
than one percent of research funding went to issues that follow people
with autism throughout their lifetime.

In order for our nation’s children to thrive, we must invest in services
that set them up for success. For this reason, I urge you to decrease the
funding gap between the estimated need and the actual funding by
increasing appropriations for IDEA Part B. I know you have been working on
these issues for some time and I appreciate the opportunity to work with
you in supporting this critical funding situation.

Sincerely,


Charles E. Schumer
United States Senator

Citywide Education Council For District 75
Council Members: Gloria Corsino / Celia Green / Gloria Smith / Margaret
Harper
Cynthia Alvarez / John Camacho / Sandra Rentas / Berangere Pierre-Louis

45-18 Court Square • Suite 229 • Long Island City, New York 11101
[Phone Image](718)752-7321
[Fax Image](718) 752-7399
•D75council@schools.nyc.gov<mailto:D75council@scho ols.nyc.gov>
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